Week 2: Gijon

Last week I posted an about page (find it here) explaining that every week my blog would focus on a different aspect of Oviedo that makes it so unique and special. And one of those aspects is Gijon, a different city only about 30 kilometers away.  Sounds weird, but don’t worry – I can explain 🙂

One of the best parts about being in Europe is that almost everything is connected, and so it’s easy to travel. Fortunately for all of us studying here, that’s especially true of Oviedo. Oviedo is the capital city of the Asturias region in Spain, which not only means that the King and Queen of Spain traveled here a few years ago (very exciting stuff – apparently they seem like a lovely couple), but also that it’s a central hub for all of the trains and buses in the region. Because of that, for only a 2.55 € ticket, we get to see all that Austurias has to offer.

Last week, our travels took us to an adventure in Gijon, Spain. We were fortunate enough to have our own private tour guides all morning: our GEO site director, and a professor from the University of Oviedo. They showed us around the city’s cultural museums, and explained everything from the architectural plan of the ancient pueblos in the area, to the process Austurains used to make sidra.

After a quick break for churros y chocolate, some of us students decided to walk around the city a bit more before heading back. We saw cute cafés, colorful buildings, and (my favorite) the ocean. We had an impromptu picnic on the beach while making friends with the local seagulls and listening to the sound of the crashing waves. After lunch, we decided to get closer to the water. It was a bit cold (it’s still January, after all) but it was so beautiful that I couldn’t help but love it!

Our adventures continue tomorrow with an early bus to Aviles, another city only about 30 kilometers away. We may be seeing another museum – we’ll definitely be ordering more churros – and we’re excited to see what the day will bring. When you live in Oviedo, there’s always the opportunity to learn and explore, and I’m having fun making the most of that!

Until next time,

Megan

P.S. As requested, I’m including more pictures of myself this time 🙂 Because of that, I want to give a photo credit shout out to Liahna and Emily. They took a lot of the pictures in this week’s blog (especially the ones on the beach – I definitely just ran right to the water without my camera), so a big thank you to both of them!

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Muséu del Pueblu d’Asturies in Gijon, Spain
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The machine previously used in the process of making sidra, a cider primarily found in Asturias
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The huge barrels used to hold sidra
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Our first view of the beautiful beach
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A sailboat off the shore heading out to the ocean
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Me walking out to the water (about two seconds later I started running – you only get to run on the beach in January so often, right? 🙂 )
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Testing the water to see how cold it is (freezing, in case you’re wondering. Easily Lake Michigan cold!)
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From left to right, Maddie, Me, and Emily on the beach
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Thanks Liahna for the shots of the museum!
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Thank you Emily for the beach pictures!

 

 

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6 thoughts on “Week 2: Gijon

  1. Man the way you describe everything is so detailed. You should definitely write a book! You could call it, “Me and Spain.”
    Aww, so cute!!! Miss you.

    Like

  2. Okay, I see a sidra addiction starting…just sayin’. 🙂 Love the pics – looks like you guys are having a great time. And a very special thank you to Maddie, Liahna and Emily for taking care of my niece. You guys rock!

    Like

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